Thursday, 25 May 2017

Not just anyBODY: a health and fitness monthly column - The Cheese Conundrum – To Eat or Not - Namrata Sundaresan


I love cheese, for me it’s a magical word that can evoke a spectrum of reactions and emotions. A food recognized world over and an essential part of the daily diet in many countries, the earliest evidence of cheese making dates back to 5,500 BCE. Cheese was made to preserve milk, although today cheese has a place of its own in the culinary map. Feta, Camembert, Cheddar, Gouda, Halloumi, Mozzarella, Burrata, Blue, Emmental or Brie… the list runs into a couple of hundreds and each one has a region of origin and a story of its own. It’s fascinating how a single ingredient, milk, can translate into so many variations with the aid of a microbe and rennet. The region of origin has a major role to play in giving the cheese its distinct character. 

A question I get asked often is, “Is eating cheese healthy?” It’s true that our taste buds love cheese but do our bodies love cheese as much. It is important to know where your cheese comes from, the type of milk used and making the distinction from processed cheese. 

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Not just anyBODY: a health and fitness monthly column - Health Recipes 13: Rendang Paneer - Uma Pushpanathan


Serves: 4
Per Serving of 100gm: 250 calories
Preparation and Cooking Time: 1 hour

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Monday, 22 May 2017

Novelty in Arts: An interesting dialogue - Footloose and fancy free with Dr. Sunil Kothari


Raza Foundation in association with Civil Officers Institute arranged a dialogue among architect Vikram Lall, Bharatanatyam dancer Rama Vaidyanathan, and poet / film maker Udayan Vajpeyi, at Civil Officers Institute in New Delhi. Ashok Vajpeyi, the Trustee of Raza foundation, introduced the speakers and the topic. What is novelty in performing arts? Is it deviation of tradition? Questioning within tradition? Sometimes such questions are seldom understood. He further said that when Ravi Shankar introduced long aalap in sitar, it was understood as novelty and later on became tradition. In classical dance forms like Bharatanatyam, Kathak, Odissi and other forms, novelty is seen as retaining continuum. He quoted Mallikarjun Mansoor, the legendary vocalist, who said that it would always be great if the rasikas sat in front row and responded, but even if they were not there and even if the hall was empty, his job was to sing. Such artists are rare now. Even if the audience was less for the evening, Ashok Vajpeyi said the evening had to carry on with few members present. 

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Friday, 19 May 2017

Ushering in Seasons - The Eastern Eye: Column by Dr.Utpal K Banerjee


The rich culture of our subcontinent finds its own way to colour the regional New Year celebrations – under either lunar or solar calendar – with ample music and dance, resonating with the whispering winds rushing through the new crops. While Ugadi in the vast tract of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka is the time to get new clothes and getting satiated with good food, Gudi Padwa is, for Maharashtrians and Konkanis, an occasion to tie gudi (a piece of bright yellow cloth) to the tip of a long bamboo and a copper pot inverted on it along with a sugar garland. Baishakhi is the biggest harvest gala across North India, especially in Punjab and Haryana, celebrated with Bhangra and Gidha dance -- as the day of forming the Sikh Khalsa -- with festivities at the birth place of the Khalsa, at the Golden Temple and at Talwandi Sabo.

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Thursday, 18 May 2017

Book Review - Drama Queens: Women who dared to succeed in a man's world - Leela Venkataraman


Drama Queens, by Veejay Sai, is about women who created history in the theatre world between 1850-1950 when art traditions were being reinterpreted to usher in a new age, amidst a rigidly patriarchal Indian society where women regarded as lesser beings, in the entertainment world, were considered lowest of the low, confined to the edges of society. Staggering in the sheer range of material pertaining to interwoven threads of history, of politics, of social attitudes, of literature and performing arts like theatre, dance, music and film, the book indeed traverses many worlds - showing the interconnectedness in art streams. To unearth biographical details on unsung Bais, devadasis, kalavantulu, sanis and tawaifs, whose contributions so enriched our art world, is not easy. And one applauds this herculean research effort where source material comprised picking up shards of "a random passing gesture, a miniscule citation in a newspaper clipping", bits of material in defunct Urdu chronicles, old Tamil and Bengali journals, Marathi scripts, vernacular press clippings and not least, bits of information provided by the occasional surviving friend or relative - to make narratives out of. 

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Saturday, 13 May 2017

Natya Bharatiyam - Footloose and fancy free with Dr. Sunil Kothari


International Dance Research and Training Centre, Hyderabad, presented a three day classical dance extravaganza Natya Bharatiyam consisting of solo Kuchipudi, group Bharatanatyam, group Kuchipudi, Kuchipudi dance dramas, group Odissi, group Kathak and also on the final day devotional songs at the Shilpa Kala Vedika auditorium at Madhapur, High Tech City, from 24th till 26th April in the evenings from 5pm. And every day it concluded around 9.30pm on account of a large number of participants. After the concluding day, I learnt from the organizers that in all 192 dancers and musicians participated. 

Madhavi Puranam, the editor of Nartanam quarterly, had a year ago arranged documentation of Kuchipudi dance dramas and Yakshaganas at Kuchpudi village in collaboration with Sangeet Natak Akademi. It was a huge affair. In December last year, Andhra Silicon Valley's Anand Kuchibhotla had arranged Kuchipudi Mahabrinda Festival at Vijayawada in keeping with his earlier similar Mahabrinda Festivals of Kuchipudi winning Guinness Book Records. It is on account of Anand Kuchibhotla's Andhra Silicon Valley group of people, whose organizing capacity is amazing, that such events are held on such grand scale.

The chief organizer of the three day Natya Bharatiyam is a young, 28 year old, traditional Kuchipudi dancer Dr. Tadepalli Satyanarayana Sarma from Kuchipudi village. His paternal grandfather Tadepalli Chandraiah was known for his Kuchipudi Pagativeshams and Kalapams. Satyanarayana's great grandfather Tadepalli Periya Sastry was the guru of Vempati Chinna Satyam. Periya Sastry and his lineage were known to support accompanists, mridangam players, nattuvanars, and literary figures for Sampradaya Bhagavata Melam. Satyanarayana is possessed with the idea of reviving the fast disappearing Yakshaganas and Kuchipudi Nritya Rupakas with the establishment of International Dance Research and Training Centre (IDRTC).

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Friday, 12 May 2017

Nine steps to visualising Tyagaraja kritis - Seen and Heard by Lakshmi Vishwanathan


I belong to a Thanjavur ancestry. Therefore, the songs of Tyagaraja were literally the melodies I woke up to. My mother Alamelu Viswanathan sang and played them on the veena as her personal offering to Rama. She taught us some famous kritis, which have stayed with me ever since. I remember both myself and my sister Sujaya singing some of the easier songs at Golus during Navarathri. 

Learning vocal music from a young age created a singing repertoire for me, which was rich in range: from the demanding Pancharatnas to the evocative poems in melodious ragas of which Tyagaraja was the exclusive master. But listening to great singers was an even more enlightening experience. I used to marvel at the torrent of "sangathis" in some kritis and enjoy the variety of ragas.

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